ChiroWorks Care Center: Chiropractic, Health, Pain Relief, Non-surgical & Non-prescription Alternatives

Dr Tony Tsai, Chiropractor in San Jose, CA for chiropractic, health and alternative medicine

Archive for June, 2008

Scoliosis Success Story with Chiropractic

Here is a success story of a patient with mild scoliosis and low back pain. You can read more about her chiropractic treatment with Graston Technique instruments in the following link: Scoliosis patient.

I used various chiropractic and physiotherapy techniques and tools like Graston Technique instruments. Graston Technique doesn’t officially endorse using their tools for scoliosis so you may not have the same results. I used their tools on certain areas of restrictions and tight muscles in conjunction with chiropractic adjustments. It is was an interesting case primarily about pain that I would like to share but I still cannot say that chiropractic or Graston Technique instruments helped without more research. Again, you may not get the same results for yourself with myself or another practitioner. Feel free to examine these before and after photos and x-ray before treatment.

 Scoliosis Before
Before X-ray
 Scoliosis After
After
 Scoliosis After
After

ChiroWorks Care Center
Anthony Tsai, D.C.
Chiropractor in San Jose, CA
ChiroWorksCareCenter.com
Graston Technique Certified

Disclaimer: The content in this blog is for informational purposes only and an opinion for specific individualized circumstances. It is not a prescription for therapy or diagnosis for you. All opinions expressed in these articles are solely those of the particular author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Anthony Tsai, Graston Technique®, its employees, providers or affiliates. Any opinions of the author on the site are or have been rendered based on scientific facts and/or anecdotal evidence, under certain conditions, and subject to certain assumptions, and may not and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose, including but not limited to for use in or in connection with any legal proceeding.

References:
National Scoliosis Foundation
ChiroWorksCareCenter.com

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Natural Pain Killers & Anti-Inflammatories for Arthritis

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce pain and inflammation by inhibiting COX enzymes. Any medication should be taken with caution even over-the-counter drugs. NSAIDs can cause stomage ulcers or bleeding and liver or kidney damage. Ice also reduces inflammation. Medicine Net has an article on ice or heat for arthritis. Here is also a self-care tips for ice. The following is an except from Bottom Line health magazine. Pay attention to the therapeutic taping section because it indirectly states how joint alignment helps with pain:

1. Drink Tea
Yes, tea. Research shows that green tea is rich in polyphenols – compounds that suppress the expression of a key gene involved in arthritis inflammation. Black tea is made from the same leaves and may be as beneficial, even though it is processed differently. Drink one or 2 cups of hot or cold tea daily.

2. Boost Your C and D
Vitamin C is believed to slow the loss of cartilage due to osteoarthritis, while a diet low in vitamin D has been shown to actually speed the progression of osteoarthritis. In a recent high-profile study, doctors discovered that patients who ate a diet high in vitamin D (or who took vitamin D supplements) reduced their risk for worsening their arthritis by 75%. Another study of over 25,000 people concluded that a low intake of vitamin C may increase the risk of developing arthritis. Take daily supplements that provide 500 to 1,000 mg of vitamin C, and 400 IUs of vitmain D.

3. Try Willow Bark/Boswellia
Willow bark is where aspirin comes from. And boswellia has been used for centuries to reduce inflammation and maintain healthy joints. A study showed that taking these 2 herbs is just as effective as taking a drug like Motrin. Take 240 mg of willow bark and 1,000 mg of boswellia per day.

4. Eat Grapes
Grape skin contains resveratrol, a natural compound known to act as a COX-2 inhibitor. Resveratrol both suppresses the Cox-2 gene and deactivates the COX-2 enzyme, which produces inflammation at the site of injury or pain. A study published in the Journal of BIological Chemistry confirmed that resveratrol acts as an antioxidant and a COX-2 inhibitor. Eat one cup of white or red grapes daily. Good news: Purple grape juice and wine contain resveratrol, too.

5. Therapeutic Taping
Wrapping tape around a joint to realign, support, and take pressure off it has great benefits for arthritis sufferers. In an Australian study, 73% of patients with osteoarthritis experienced substantially reduced symptoms after just 3 weeks of therapeutic taping. The benefits were comparable with those achieved by standard drug treatments and lasted even after taping was stopped! Important: Taping must be done properly to be effective. Consult a physician or physical therapist who can show you or a family member the proper technique.

ChiroWorks Care Center
Anthony Tsai, D.C.
Chiropractor in San Jose, CA
ChiroWorksCareCenter.com
Graston Technique Certified

Disclaimer: The content in this blog is for informational purposes only and an opinion for specific individualized circumstances. It is not a prescription for therapy or diagnosis for you. All opinions expressed in these articles are solely those of the particular author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Anthony Tsai, Graston Technique®, its employees, providers or affiliates. Any opinions of the author on the site are or have been rendered based on scientific facts and/or anecdotal evidence, under certain conditions, and subject to certain assumptions, and may not and should not be used or relied upon for any other purpose, including but not limited to for use in or in connection with any legal proceeding.

References:
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=18347
http://healththing.com/treatment1.htm
“5 Little-Known Ways to Reduce Arthritis Pain Without Painkillers and Anti-Inflammatories”, Bottom Line, Summer 2008, p 9.